Literary

Review: The Secret History

The Secret History by Donna Tartt, published July 1993 by Penguin Books.

The Secret HistoryRead: February 2016
Genre: Fiction/Mystery/Literary
Source: Purchased
#Pages: 629
Get It Now: Wordery

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Goodreads Synopsis: Truly deserving of the accolade Modern Classic, Donna Tartt’s cult bestseller The Secret History is a remarkable achievement – both compelling and elegant, dramatic and playful.

Under the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality their lives are changed profoundly and for ever.

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Review: Go Set A Watchman

Go Set A Watchman Book CoverGo Set A Watchman by Harper Lee, published July 2015 by William Heinemann.

Read: October 2015
Genre: Adult/Historical/Literary
Source: Gifted
#Pages: 278
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Goodreads Synopsis: Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch, “Scout”, returns home from New York City to visit her ageing father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise’s homecoming turns bitter-sweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt.

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Review: To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird Book CoverTo Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, (my edition) published June 2010 by Arrow Books

Read: April 2015
Genre: Young Adult/Classics/Historical
Source: Purchased
#Pages: 309
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Goodreads Synopsis: ‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ’em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ A lawyer’s advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee’s classic novel – a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with exuberant humour the irrationality of adult attitudes to race and class in the Deep South of the thirties. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina of one man’s struggle for justice. But the weight of history will only tolerate so much.

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Review: Be Safe I Love You

be safe I love you book coverBe Safe I Love You by Cara Hoffman, published February 2015 by Little Brown Group UK.

Read: February 2015
Genre: Adult/Literary/Military/Contemporary
Source: Publisher
#Pages: 289
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Goodreads Synopsis: Lauren Clay has returned from a tour of duty in Iraq just in time to spend the holidays with her family. Before she enlisted, Lauren, and her brother, Danny, made the most of their modest circumstances, escaping into their imaginations and forming an indestructible bond. Joining the army allowed Lauren to continue to provide for her family, but it came at a great cost.

Be Safe I Love You is a novel about war and homecoming, love and duty, and an impassioned look at the effects of war on women, as soldiers and caregivers, both at home and on the front lines.

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Review: All The Light We Cannot See

All The Light We Cannot See Book CoverAll The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, published May 2014 by Scribner.

Read: January 2015
Genre: Adult/Literary/Historical Fiction
Source: Library
#Pages: 448
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Goodreads Synopsis: Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History where he works as the master of the locks. When she is six, she goes blind, and her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, every house, every manhole, so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint-Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie-Laure’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea.

In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up with his younger sister, Jutta, both enchanted by a crude radio Werner finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far-flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint-Malo, where his path converges with Marie-Laure.

The Review

I don’t know what went wrong here. I really don’t. I LOVE WW2 fiction, and I love nothing more than original WW2 fiction – and the premise for this novel was original, it was intriguing, and at times it was beautifully written, but for some reason it just didn’t click with me. I’m going to use this review to try and figure out why.

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Review: Life After Life

Life After Life Book CoverLife After Life by Kate Atkinson, published 2014 by Black Swan (Random House).

Read: October 2014
Genre: Adult Fiction/Sci-Fi/Fantasy/Historical/Literary Fiction
Source: Purchased
#Pages: 622
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Goodreads Synopsis: What if you had the chance to live your life again and again, until you finally got it right?

During a snowstorm in England in 1910, a baby is born and dies before she can take her first breath. During a snowstorm in England in 1910, the same baby is born and lives to tell the tale. What if there were second chances? And third chances? In fact an infinite number of chances to live your life? Would you eventually be able to save the world from its own inevitable destiny? And would you even want to?

Life After Life follows Ursula Todd as she lives through the turbulent events of the last century again and again. With wit and compassion, Kate Atkinson finds warmth even in life’s bleakest moments, and shows an extraordinary ability to evoke the past. Here she is at her most profound and inventive, in a novel that celebrates the best and worst of ourselves.

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