International Women’s Day Book Recs!

International-Womens-Day-logo

#BEBOLDFORCHANGE

The theme of this year’s International Women’s Day is #BeBoldForChange – to help women and girls achieve their ambitions; challenge conscious and unconscious bias; call for gender-balanced leadership; value women and men’s contributions equally; and create inclusive flexible cultures.

The World Economic Forum predicts the gender gap won’t close entirely until 2186. This is too long to wait. Around the world, IWD can be an important catalyst and vehicle for driving greater change for women and moving closer to gender parity. Check out the official IWD Videos.

International Women’s Day Non-Fiction Recs

International Womens Day NonFiction Books

  • Bad Feminist (4.5/5*) – I read this book a couple of years ago, and it awakened my inner feminist! Fantastic, accessible read. Full review of Bad Feminist.
  • Hot Feminist (4/5*) – Polly Vernon tackles the difficult questions surrounding modern-day feminism with sarcasm, insight, and wit. Full review of Hot Feminist
  • The Good Psychopath’s Guide to Success (4/5*) – While not marketed directly to women, this book touches on many of the qualities deemed necessary to get-ahead, that women tend to struggle with, in their battle to be assertive and remain “liked” in the workplace. Full review of The Good Psychopath’s Guide to Success.
  • I Call Myself A Feminist (3.5/5*) – Is “feminism” still a dirty word? This book contains short essays from 25 women under thirty, dissecting what feminism means to them.
  • Full Frontal Feminism (3/5*) – While this isn’t a favourite of mine, there are interesting and useful nuggets of information in this text. A good introduction or all-rounder, it wouldn’t be my go-to recommendation, but it does add to the conversation.
  • Lean In – I shamefully started, but have yet to finish this one. From what I’ve read it’s full of eye-opening anecdotes and facts, and it’s definitely the kind of book you need to read with a pen and paper handy to take notes!
  • Why Women Don’t Ask – I’m in the middle of this read, and it’s another great one that looks at the innate differences between genders, and how these can be overcome, as well as how to work within the constraints of societal perception, for women to succeed in the workplace!
  • I Am Malala – One that is on my bookshelf, and I have yet to get to. If ever there was an inspirational woman, Malala Yousafzai is she.
  • Everyday Sexism – Another I have on my TBR, what started as a TED Talk and anonymous online forum, has now become a phenomenon, and published text. This book argues that sexism has been normalised. And it’s time for change.

International Women’s Day Fiction Recs

International Womens Day Fiction Books

  • The Double Life of Mistress Kit Kavanagh (5/5*) – One of my favourite books of 2016, this novel is based on the true story of Mother Ross, a brave and fierce Irish woman. When her husband is taken as a soldier, Kit enlists in the Duke of Marlborough’s regiment, disguised as a man, to follow him across war-torn Italy. And that’s just the beginning! Full review of The Double Life of Mistress Kit Kavanagh.
  • Through the Barricades (4.5/5*) – This is a story of friendship, love, war and revolution. She was willing to sacrifice everything for her country. He was willing to sacrifice everything for her. Full review of Through the Barricades.
  • Asking For It (4.5/5*) – A brutal, important, relevant, and emotional novel, based on true events. A book all ages and genders should read. I was compelled to write #NotAskingForIt upon finishing the book. Full review of Asking For It
  • Only Ever Yours (4/5*) – Suppoesedly reminiscint of The Handmaid’s Tale, this debut novel will make you stop and question the society around you. eves are designed, not made. The School trains them to be pretty. The School trains them to be good. The School trains them to Always be Willing. Full review of Only Ever Yours.
  • The Handmaid’s Tale – I recently purchased a copy of this, and have heard nothing but good things about it. A dystopian novel where women’s rights are completely revoked. Is the truth stranger than fiction?

Check out Wordery’s picks with up to 33% off and FREE delivery!

Do you have any recommendations to add to this list? Let me know in the comments, and I’ll add them in to make one super list of recommended reads!


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About Rachel

Avid reader & book blogger. Lover of Business. A fan of drinks & dancing. Ever optimistic. Feminist.

11 Responses

  1. Love that you included The Handmaid’s Tale on this list! It’s such an amazing story that I always think about even though I read it years ago. It definitely sticks with you and makes you think about how women are treated in society today and where we’re headed.

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  2. These are some really great books and I haven’t read some of them! I totally agree with the inclusion of Louise O’Neill’s books and The Handmaid’s Tale which I haven’t read in forever but it was definitely a powerful read. The book I would instantly include would be How To Be A Woman but that seems very obvious. I also want to read Come As You Are which is really more about how women should embrace their body and their sexuality but I’ve not read it so I don’t know. And another unread book which is on my list is All The SIngle Ladies about how women are marrying later, it sounds very interesting.

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